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Information Resource
Record information and status
Record ID
101082
Status
Published
Date of creation
2010-03-30 13:55 UTC (andrew.bowers@cbd.int)
Date of last update
2012-05-08 19:39 UTC (dina.abdelhakim@cbd.int)
Date of publication
2012-05-08 19:39 UTC (dina.abdelhakim@cbd.int)

General Information
Title
Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)- The significance of gene flow through pollen transfer (Environmental issue report- No 28)
Author
Katie Eastham and Jeremy Sweet, with contributions from other participants in the AIGM programme
Organization(s) involved in the publication of this resource
Dr J. B. Sweet
National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB)
Huntingdom Road
Cambridge
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, CB3 0LE
Email:jeremy.sweet@niab.com
Language(s)
  • English
Publication date
2002
Subject
Summary, abstract or table of contents
The Table of Contents is as follows:

Executive summary

Project summary

1. Introduction
1.1. Aims and objectives of the report
1.2. Background
1.3. Factors affecting pollen dispersal and cross-pollination
1.4. Hybridisation, gene flow and introgression
1.5. Routes of transgene movement between species

2. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus ssp. oleifera)
with reference to turnip rape (Brassica rapa)
2.1. Reproductive biology and crop use
2.2. Genetic modification
2.3. Pollen dispersal
2.4. Gene flow: Crop to crop
2.5. Gene flow: Crop to wild relative
2.6. Conclusion

3. Sugar beet and fodder beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris)
3.1. Reproductive biology and crop use
3.2. Genetic modification
3.3. Pollen dispersal
3.4. Gene flow: Crop to crop
3.5. Definition and status as a weed plant
3.6. Gene flow: Crop to wild relative
3.7. Conclusion

4. Potato (Solanum tuberosum)
4.1. Reproductive biology and crop use
4.2. Genetic modification
4.3. Pollen dispersal
4.4. Gene flow: Crop to crop
4.5. Definition and status as a weed plant
4.6. Gene flow: Crop to wild relative
4.7. Conclusion

4 Genetically modified organisms (GMOs): The significance of gene flow through pollen transfer

5. Maize (Zea mays)
5.1. Reproductive biology and crop use
5.2. Genetic modification
5.3. Pollen dispersal
5.4. Gene flow: Crop to crop
5.5. Definition and status as a weed plant
5.6. Gene flow: Crop to wild relative
5.7. Conclusion

6. Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
6.1. Reproductive biology and crop use
6.2. Genetic modification
6.3. Pollen dispersal
6.4. Gene flow: Crop to crop
6.5. Definition and status as a weed plant
6.6. Gene flow: Crop to wild relative
6.7. Conclusion

7. Barley (Hordeum vulgare)
7.1. Reproductive biology and crop use
7.2. Genetic modification
7.3. Pollen dispersal
7.4. Gene flow: Crop to crop
7.5. Definition and status as a weed plant
7.6. Gene flow: Crop to wild relative
7.7. Conclusion

8. Fruit crops
8.1. Strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa)
8.2. Apples (Malus x domestica)
8.3. Grapevines (Vitis vinifera)
8.4. Plums (Prunus domestica)
8.5. Blackberries (Rubus fruticosus) and raspberries (Rubus idaeus)
8.6. Blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum)

9. Evaluation and conclusions
9.1. Oilseed rape
9.2. Sugar beet
9.3. Potato
9.4. Maize
9.5. Wheat
9.6. Barley
9.7. Fruit crops

10. Future considerations and recommendations
10.1.Gene flow: Crop to crop
10.2.Gene flow: Crop to wild relatives
10.3.Gene flow barriers

Acknowledgements

References

Appendix: Assessment of the impacts of genetically modified plants (AIGM)
Thematic areas
  • Scientific and technical issues
    • Risk assessment
  • Risk assessment and risk management
Background material to the “Guidance on risk assessment of living modified organisms”
Is this document is recommend as background material for the “Guidance on Risk Assessment of Living Modified Organisms”
Yes
Section(s) of the “Guidance on Risk Assessment of Living Modified Organisms” this background material is relevant
Additional Information
Type of resource
  • Report / Review / Fact sheet / Notes
Identifier
ISBN: 92-9167-411-7
Publisher and its location
European Environment Agency (EEA), Copenhagen
Rights
© EEA, Copenhagen, 2002
Format
75-page PDF file