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Third National Report on the implementation of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety
Record information and status
Record ID
109097
Status
Published
Date of creation
2015-10-29 10:37 UTC (wang.jie@mep.gov.cn)
Date of last update
2015-11-23 18:31 UTC (andrew.bowers@cbd.int)
Date of publication
2015-11-23 18:31 UTC (andrew.bowers@cbd.int)

This document is also available in the following languages:
Origin of report
1. Country
  • China
Contact officer for report
Coordinates
女士 欣 井
Division Director, Biosafety Administration Office
Department of Nature and Ecology Conservation, Ministry of Environmental Protection
No. 26, Ping'anlixi Street, Xicheng District, Beijing P.R.China
Beijing
China, 100034
Phone:+86 10 66556322
Fax:+86 10 66556327
Email:jing.xin@mep.gov.cn
Consulted stakeholders
9. Organizations/stakeholders who were consulted or participated in the preparation of this report
Ministry of Environmental Protection, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Agriculture, National Health and Family Planning Commission, State Administration of Customs, State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, State Forestry Administration, China Food and Drug Administration, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences of MEP, Biotechnology Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Chinese, Chinese Research Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Chinese Academy of Forestry, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, National Food Safety Supervision and Inspection Center, Zhejiang University, Institute of Botany of CAS
Submission
10. Date of submission
2015-10-29
11. Time period covered by this report
Start date
2011-10-01
11. Time period covered by this report
End date
2015-10-28
Party to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety
Is your country a Party to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (CPB)?
  • Yes
Article 2 – General provisions
14. Has your country introduced the necessary legal, administrative and other measures for the implementation of the Protocol?
This question is relevant to indicators 1.1.1, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, and 3.1.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • A domestic regulatory framework is fully in place
15. If you indicated that a national biosafety framework exists in the above question, when did it become operational?
This question is relevant to the indicator 1.1.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • 2001 or earlier
16. Which specific instruments are in place for the implementation of your national biosafety framework?
  • One or more national biosafety regulations
  • One or more sets of biosafety guidelines
17. Has your country established a mechanism for the budgetary allocations of funds for the operation of its national biosafety framework?
  • No
18. Does your country have permanent staff to administer functions directly related to the national biosafety framework?
  • Yes
19. If you answered Yes to question 18, how many permanent staff members are in place whose functions are directly related to the national biosafety framework?
  • More than 10
20. Has your country’s biosafety framework / laws / regulations / guidelines been submitted to the Biosafety Clearing-House (BCH)?
  • Partially
21. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 2 in your country
Currently the following bodies for biosafety management have been established in the relevant competent authorities of China:
National Biosafety Administration Office has been established in the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP). Externally it serves as national focal point of BCH. Domestically it coordinates the environment management of biotechnologies at national level. This office is responsible for formulating national biosafety policies, programmes, regulations and standards and overseeing their implementation. It manages the environmental safety of genetically modified organisms and coordinates the national implementation of relevant multilateral environmental agreements. This office has three regular staff members while the Department of International Cooperation of the MEP as NFP for the CPB has four regular staff members. They are responsible for international cooperation and exchange in the field of biosafety.
The Ministry of Agriculture (MOA) has established a division for biosafety (GMOs) and intellectual property rights. This division is responsible for managing the risks of agricultural GMOs throughout the whole cycle from their research, testing, production, processing, operation, import and export. This division has 5 regular staff members. The MOA has established a Committee on Biosafety of Agricultural Genetically Modified Organisms in consultation with member departments of the Interministrial Committee, in accordance with the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs. This committee is responsible for risk assessments of agricultural GMOs and provides technical guidance for biosafety management of GMOs. The agriculture departments in the governments above county level exercise their responsibilities of supervising and managing the biosafety of agricultural GMOs within their repsective administrative jurisdictions, in accordance with relevant provisions in the above Regulation. Those institutions undertaking research and experiments in GMOs have established their own task forces on biosafety of agricultural GMOs to manage risks related to their research and experimental activities. During this reporting period, the MOA has issued its 2015 programme of work for supervision of biosafety of agricultural GMOs with a view to further enhancing biosafety management of GMOs.
The State Forestry Administration (SFA) has established a division to manage forest biosafety, which has three regular staff members. SFA set up a Committee on Biosafety of Forest Genetic Engineering to assess risks associated with forest GMOs across the country.
Within the State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (SAQSIQ), the Department of Animal and Plant Quarantine and Supervision is responsible for the quarantine and inspection of imported and exported GMOs. Relevant work is shared among the departments responsible for food inspection and animal and plant inspection and quarantine. SAQSIQ has 35 local administrations across the country and they are responsible for the inspection and quarantine of imported and exported GMOs and their products.
Universities under the Ministry of Education undertake the development of various GMOs and risk assessments of GMOs entrusted by the competent authorities. To effectively undertake risk assessments of GMOs and ensure their environmental safety, these institutions have established their biosafety committees and leading groups and developed their own management rules in this regard to guide and regulate the safety management of research and development of GMOs, with the supervision of relevant competent authorities.
The Ministry of Science and Technology has set up a biosafety office to coordinate the biosafety management related to science and technology development and innovation and develop plans for science and technology development related to biosiafety.
The State Customs Administration supervises the import and export of all goods including GMOs in accordance with relevant laws.
In practical work, various competent authorities exercise their respective responsibilities in a coordinated manner for supervising the import and export of GMOs in different stages. Prior to the import, the applicants need to apply for safety certificates of imported goods from the sectoral competent authorities (MOA or SFA). Upon arrival at ports or customs, SAQSIQ verifies the imported goods in accordance with the safety certificates and issues the customs clearance bills after verification, and the SCA will handle customs clearance in accordance relevant regulations and rules.
The regulations and sectoral bulletins related to biosafety issued in China since 2011 include:
In December 2013, the State Forestry Administration issued "Rules for Monitoring of Biosafety of GM Trees" (SFAST No. 215, 2013). The rules were effective from 1 February 2014, and will be valid till 31 January 2019.
In August 2014, MOA issued its Bulletin No. 2147, concerning "On-Line Application for Administrative Approval of Agricultural GMOs".
The national health sector standard (WS/T 442-2014) effective from 15 December 2014, that contains  biosafety guidelines for clinical labs regulates the biosafety management of clinical labs.
The revised Food Safety Law of the People's Republic of China adopted in April 2015 by the fourteenth meeting of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress includes additional provisions concerning GM food labeling and related rules for penalties. The law was effective from 1 October 2015.
In addition, the MOA, SAQSIQ and MEP have issued a series of national and sectoral standards for testing GM composition and the environmental safety of GMOs. SAQSIQ and its local administrations have issued local standards for screening GM composition, determination of tolerance traits of GM crops, and safe operations in labs and in the environmental release, thus contributing significantly to improving the legal system for biosafety management of GMOs.
Article 5 - Pharmaceuticals
22. Does your country regulate the transboundary movement, handling and use of living modified organisms (LMOs) which are pharmaceuticals?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
Safety Control Measures for the Field Trial of Genetically Modified Plant-Part II: GM Plant for Pharmaceutical and industrial use ( MOA Bulletin No.2259-14-2015).
23. If you answered Yes to question 22, has this information been submitted to the BCH?
  • No
24. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 5 in your country:
The Ministry of Agriculture issued a series of national standards on genetically modified plants on 21 May 2015. These include Safety Control Measures for the Field Trial of Genetically Modified Plant-Part II: GM Plant for Pharmaceutical and industrial use ( see MOA Bulletin No.2259-14-2015). These standards apply to the intermediate testing, environmental release and production experiment of genetically modified plants for industrial and pharmaceutical uses. The standards are effective from 1 August 2015.
Article 6 – Transit and Contained use
25. Does your country regulate the transit of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.8.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
26. Does your country regulate the contained use of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicators 1.1.2 and 1.8.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
27. If you answered Yes to questions 25 or 26, has this information been submitted to the BCH?
  • Yes
28. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 6 in your country:
There are clear provisions in the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs that address related issues: Article 5 on the import and export of agricultural GMOs; Article 2 on the agricultural GMOs used for research and experiment; Article 3 on the agricultural GMOs used for production; and Article 4 on the agricultural GMOs used for processing.
Article 12 of the Regulation on Inspection and Quarantine of Imported and Exported GM Products requires that the owner  or its agent(s) should submit an advanced application to the State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine for the transit of GM products, and to provide the following documents: (a) a filled-in form of application for permission of the transit of GM products; (b) proof of approval issued by the competent authorities of the exporting country or region for undertaking research overseas or for placing on the market for corresponding uses; (c) specifications of uses of GM products and safety and precautionary measures to be taken; and (d) other relevant materials.
Articles 7 to 10 – Advance Informed Agreement (AIA) and intentional introduction of LMOs into the environment
29. Has your country adopted law(s) / regulations / administrative measures for the operation of the AIA procedure of the Protocol OR a domestic regulatory framework consistent with the Protocol regarding the transboundary movement of LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment?
This question is relevant to indicators 1.1.2 and 3.1.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
30. Has your country established a mechanism for taking decisions regarding first intentional transboundary movements of LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment?
  • Yes
31. If you answered Yes to question 30, does the mechanism also apply to cases of intentional introduction of LMOs into the environment that were not subject to transboundary movement?
  • Yes
32. Has your country established legal requirements for exporters under its jurisdiction to notify in writing the competent national authority of the Party of import prior to the intentional transboundary movement of an LMO that falls within the scope of the AIA procedure?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
There are relevant provisions in the Regulation on Inspection and Quarantine of Imported and Exported GM Products and the Regulation and Approval of Forest Genetic Engineering.
33. Has your country established legal requirements for the accuracy of information contained in the notification?
  • Yes
34. Has your country ever received an application / notification regarding intentional transboundary movements of LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.1.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
35. Has your country ever taken a decision on an application / notification regarding intentional transboundary movements of LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
36. If you answered Yes to question 35, how many LMOs has your country approved to date for import for intentional introduction into the environment?
  • More than 10
37. If you answered Yes to question 35, how many LMOs, not imported, has your country approved to date for intentional introduction into the environment?
  • More than 10
38. In the current reporting period, how many applications/notifications has your country received regarding intentional transboundary movements of LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment?
  • None
39. In the current reporting period, how many decisions has your country taken regarding intentional transboundary movements of LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment?
  • None
46. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Articles 7-10 in your country, including measures in case of lack of scientific certainty on potential adverse effects of LMOs for intentional introduction to the environment
In accordance with the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs, the Regulation on Safety Management of Import of Agricultural GMOs and the Regulation on Risk Management of Agricultural GMOs, the Ministry of Agriculture processes applications, undertakes risk assessments and approves the introduction to the environment. MOA issues approval results within specified time limits and informs the applicants accordingly as well as publishes approval results on its website on a regular basis. The experts recommended by the departments of the environment, forestry, inspection and quarantine, health, education and the Chinese Academy of Sciences sit on the Committee on Biosafety of Agricultural GMOs which is led by the MOA, and are involved in the risk assessments of agricultural GMOs. In case of lack of scientific uncertainty of the potential negative impacts of LMOs for the intentional introduction to the environment, the applicants are required to provide further scientific data and are not allowed to introduce LMOs to  environment before more data provided. So far MOA has designated 42 institutions to verify genetic modified components and assess environmental and food risks.
Articles 14, 15 and 16 in the Regulation on Approval of Forest Genetic Engineering, issued by the State Forestry Administration in 2006, provide the application procedures and requirements for materials submitted that should be followed for the import and export of genetically modified trees. Article 16 provides that SFA can provide relevant approval documents for the export of forest products, if the importer requires provision of such document indicating whether forest products are genetically modified or not.
The Regulation on Inspection and Quarantine of Import and Export of GM Products provides requirements for the inspection and quarantine of the import of GM animals and plants and their products, GM micro-organisms and their products, and food.  Only those qualified in the inspection can be allowed for import. In addition, the Regulation contains provisions for the inspection and quarantine of the exported products: "if GM inspection is required for the exported products, the owner or its agent(s) should submit in advance an application to the inspection and quarantine departments in their jurisdictions, which can issue an approval document based on the inspection reports after having ensured that the the exported GM products have met the import requirements of the importing countries or regions.
So far China has approved 7 varieties of  LMOs(not imported) for the intentional introduction to the environment, including ripen-delay transgenic tomato,color-altered transgenic petunia, anti-virus transgenic sweet pepper, anti-virus transgenic tomato, anti-insect transgenic cotton, anti-virus papaya, and anti-insect transgenic  Populus nigra. Safety certificates have been issued to anti-insect GM rice and phytase transgenic maize. In addition, 30 plants such as GM rice, cotton, maize, cole, potato, soybeans, wheat and trees have been allowed for the intermediate testing, environmental release or experimental production.
Main barriers that China has encountered at this stage are inadequate information sharing of imported LMOs, lack of technical criteria for verification, standard products for verification and reference materials. During the twelfth five-year-plan period, China implemented major projects on developing new varieties of GMOs and achieved some progress in developing techniques for accurate verification and reference materials.
Article 11 – Procedure for living modified organisms intended for direct use as food or feed, or for processing (LMOs-FFP)
47. Has your country adopted specific law(s) or regulation(s) for decision-making regarding domestic use, including placing on the market, of LMOs-FFP?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.1.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
48. Has your country established legal requirements for the accuracy of information to be provided by the applicant?
  • Yes
49. Has your country established a mechanism to ensure that decisions regarding LMOs-FFP that may be subject to transboundary movement will be communicated to the Parties through the BCH?
This question is relevant to indicator 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
50. Has your country established a mechanism for taking decisions on the import of LMOs-FFP?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.1.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
51. Has your country indicated its needs for financial and technical assistance and capacity-building in respect of LMOs-FFP?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
52. Has your country ever taken a decision on LMOs-FFP (either on import or domestic use)?
  • Yes
53. How many LMOs-FFP has your country approved to date?
  • More than 10
54. In the current reporting period, how many decisions has your country taken regarding the import of LMOs-FFP?
  • More than 10
55. In the current reporting period, how many decisions has your country taken regarding domestic use, including placing on the market, of LMOs-FFP?
  • More than 10
56. Has your country informed the Parties through the BCH of its decision(s) regarding import, of LMOs-FFP?
This question is relevant to indicator 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
57. Has your country informed the Parties through the BCH of its decision(s) regarding domestic use, including placing on the market, of LMOs-FFP within 15 days?
  • No
58. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 11 in your country, including measures in case of lack of scientific certainty on potential adverse effects of LMOs-FFP
The Biosafety Administration Office of Agricultural GMOs in the Ministry of Agriculture processes and approves the applications of imported GMOs, in accordance with the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs and the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Import and Export of Agricultural GMOs. In the case of lack of scientific uncertainties of the potential negative impacts of LMOs intended for direct use as food or feed or processing, the applicants are required to provide further information. The intended uses are not allowed before further information is provided.
The monitoring of environmental risks of GMOs and food safety inspection must be undertaken by those institutions specialized in the environmental and food safety testing, which have been accredited by the MOA. The import of LMOs for intended uses for food, feed or processing can be given the safety certificate after the risk assessment has been undertaken by the Committee on Biosafety of Agricultural GMOs and approved by the MOA. Major or significant related issues that arise from the assessments must be submitted for discussion by the National Inter-ministrial Committee on Biosafety of GMOs, which is composed of 12 ministries and commissions. 
During 2012-2013, the MOA approved the import of 29 agricultural GMOs used for processing, including herbicide tolerant soybeans (A 2704-12), anti-insect and herbicide tolerant corn (MON88017), anti-insect maize (MON89034), anti-insect and herbicide tolerant corn (GHB119), quality-improved soybeans (305423), drought tolerant corn (MON87460), herbicide resistant corn (GHB614), anti-insect corn (15985), roundup rape(GT73), roundup beet (H7-1), anti-insect and herbicide tolerant corn (59122), herbicide tolerant GM corn (1445) and anti-insect GM corn (MON810).
Article 12 – Review of decision
59. Has your country established a mechanism for the review and change of a decision regarding an intentional transboundary movement of LMOs?
  • Yes
60. Has your country ever received a request for a review of a decision?
  • Yes
61. Has your country ever reviewed / changed a decision regarding an intentional transboundary movement of LMOs?
  • Yes, decision reviewed
62. In the current reporting period, how many decisions were reviewed and/or changed regarding an intentional transboundary movement of an LMO?
  • More than 5
63. Has your country informed both the notifier and the BCH of the review and/or changes in the decision?
This question is relevant to indicators 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • In some cases only the notifier
64. Has your country informed both the notifier and the BCH of the review and changes in the decision within thirty days?
  • No
65. Has your country provided reasons to both the notifier and the BCH for the review and/or changes in the decision?
This question is relevant to indicator 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • In some cases only the notifier
66. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 12 in your country
Article 19 of the Regulation on Approval of Forest Genetic Engineering provides that the State Forestry Administration shall make a decision on whether an administrative approval will be granted or not within 20 days after the application is received, and issue a certificate of approval or disapproval and inform the applicant accordingly. Meanwhile this Article also provides that time needed for expert review, proofing and verification shall not be counted as time for making decisions and issuing certificates of administrative approval.
Article 36 of the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs provides that the agriculture department in the State Council and the state administration responsible for inspection and quarantine shall make a decision on whether an approval will be granted or not within 270 days after the application is submitted, and inform the applicant accordingly.
The safety certificate issued for LMOs used for food, feed and processing has a limited period of validity. Once the certificate expires, a new application must be submitted for continued imports and placing on the market. In 2013 renewal applications were submitted for 10 GMOs for import.
For thousands of tons of GM soybeans and corns intended for uses as feed or for processing imported by China annually, the quality supervision department reviews and processes applications for the import of LMOs directly used as food, feed or processing, in accordance with Regulation on Inspection and Quarantine of Import and Export of GM Products and the Law on Quarantine of Animals and Plants. For the import of other products, import permission application forms need to be filled in with clear indication of whether these products contain genetically modified products or not so as to determine  whether the import of these products will go through regular trade and import procedures.
Article 13 – Simplified procedure
67. Has your country established a system for the application of the simplified procedure regarding an intentional transboundary movement of LMOs?
  • Yes
68. Has your country ever applied the simplified procedure?
  • No
70. In the current reporting period, how many LMOs has your country applied the simplified procedure to?
  • None
71. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 13 in your country
With regard to the circumstances where the simplified procedures are applied, China has provided details in its first and second national reports. So far there is no case of applying the simplified procedures for the transboundary movement of LMOs.
Article 14 – Bilateral, regional and multilateral agreements and arrangements
72. Has your country entered into any bilateral, regional or multilateral agreements or arrangements?
  • No
76. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 14 in your country
None.
Articles 15 & 16 – Risk Assessment and Risk Management
77. Has your country established a national framework for conducting risk assessments prior to taking decisions regarding LMOs?
  • Yes
78. If you answered Yes to question 77, does this framework include procedures for identifying and/or training national experts to conduct risk assessments?
  • Yes
79. How many people in your country have been trained in risk assessment, monitoring, management and control of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.3 of the Strategic Plan
a) Risk assessment:
  • 100 or more
b) Management / Control:
  • 100 or more
c) Monitoring:
  • 100 or more
80. Is your country using training material and/or technical guidance for training in risk assessment and risk management of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
81. Is your country using the "Manual on Risk Assessment of LMOs" (developed by CBD Secretariat) for training in risk assessment?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
82. Is your country using the "Guidance on Risk Assessment of LMOs" (developed by the Online Forum and the AHTEG on Risk Assessment and Risk Management) for training in risk assessment?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
83. Are the currently available training materials or technical guidance on risk assessment and/or risk management of LMOs sufficient?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.6 of the Strategic Plan
  • Not applicable
84. Does your country have the capacity to detect, identify, assess and/or monitor living modified organisms or specific traits that may have adverse effects on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, taking into account risks to human health?
This question is relevant to indicators 1.4.2 and 1.6.3 of the Strategic Plan
a) Detect:
  • Yes
b) Identify:
  • Yes
c) Assess:
  • Yes
d) Monitor:
  • Yes
85. Has your country adopted or used any guidance documents for the purpose of conducting risk assessment or risk management, or for evaluating risk assessment reports submitted by notifiers?
This question is relevant to indicators 1.3.1 of the Strategic Plan
a) Risk assessment:
  • Yes
b) Risk management:
  • Yes
86. Is your country using the "Guidance on Risk Assessment of LMOs" (developed by the Online Forum and the AHTEG on Risk Assessment and Risk Management) for conducting risk assessment or risk management, or for evaluating risk assessment reports submitted by notifiers?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
87. Has your country adopted any common approaches to risk assessment with other countries?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.3.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
88. Has your country cooperated with other Parties with a view to identifying LMOs or specific traits that may have adverse effects on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.4.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
89. Has your country ever conducted a risk assessment of an LMO including any type of risk assessment of LMOs, e.g. for contained use, field trials, commercial purposes, direct use as food, feed, or for processing?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.3.3 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
90. If you answered Yes to question 89, please indicate the scope of the risk assessments (select all that apply):
  • Commercial production
  • Field trial
  • LMOs for Contained use
  • LMOs for direct use as food
  • LMOs for direct use as feed
  • LMOs for processing
91. If you answered Yes to question 89, were the summary reports of the risk assessments submitted to the BCH?
This question is relevant to indicator 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
92. If you answered Yes to question 89, were risk assessments conducted for all decisions taken on LMOs for intentional introduction into the environment or on domestic use of LMOs for direct use as food, feed, or for processing?
  • Yes, always
93. If you answered Yes to question 89, how many risk assessments were conducted in the current reporting period?
  • More than 10
94. Has your country taken measures to ensure that any LMO, whether imported or locally developed, undergoes an appropriate period of observation that is commensurate with its life-cycle or generation time before it is put to its intended use?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
The Rules for the Safety Administration of Import of Agricultural GMOs require only the assessment on reports of imported agricultural GMOs intended for use as processing materials, but observation is not required.
95. Has your country established a mechanism for monitoring potential effects of LMOs that are released into the environment?
  • Yes
96. Does your country have the infrastructure (e.g. laboratory facilities) for monitoring or managing LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.2.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
97. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Articles 15 and 16 in your country
The Rules for Risk Assessment of Agricultural GMOs have made clear provisions. Risk assessment and monitoring should be undertaken for all GMOs, for import or for research and development within the country. The applicant should also provide measures for handling residues of GMOs and post-harvest control measures. The Biosafety Committee of Agricultural GMOs examines three times a year risk assessment reports of agricultural GMOs in the environmental release phase, experimental production phase and the safety certificate issuance phase. The Law on Food Safety and the Law on the Quality of Agricultural Products have established rules for risk assessment and monitoring of food safety. The MOA has developed guidelines for safety inspection of the field testing of GM crops in order to strengthen the management of the plantation of GM crops. The guidelines provide measures for removing residues and other plants after the testing.
The GM risk assessment strategies used in China follow relevant guidelines developed by relevant international organizations such as CAC and OECD. The assessment techniques and methods draw upon those internationally widely adopted principles and techniques, such as science-based principle, substantial equivalence principle, case-by-case principle and step-by-step principle. Assessment techniques and methods are used such as those of traditional biology, ecology, molecular biology, bioinformatics, traditional toxicology and allergy. Safety assessments are undertaken one-by-one for the recipient, parental organism and modified genes of GMOs, GM food and environmental safety.
Universities under the Ministry of Education, while developing GMOs and undertaking safety assessments, must undertake research activities under the supervision of their biosafety groups. They must take relevant safety measures provided in relevant national laws and administrative regulations and rules, including those for lab safety and the environmental release in gardens. They must follow application and approval procedures for using GM materials in the experiments and assessing their risks. They must also submit applications to the MOA and provide required data when proceeding to the risk assessment phase after the indoor experiment phase is completed, or moving from one phase to another in undertaking tests for risk assessments. They can move on to the next testing phase only after their applications are approved.
The State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine inspects and quarantines GM products for import or transit through verifying GM elements, in accordance with the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs and the Rules for Inspection and Quarantine of Imported and Exported GM Products. SAQSIQ ensures the smooth and safe transboundary movement of GMOs while protecting China's environment, agriculture and forestry production, and human and animal health.
Article 17 – Unintentional transboundary movements and emergency measures
98. Has your country established and maintained appropriate measures to prevent unintentional transboundary movements of LMOs?
  • Yes
99. Has your country established a mechanism for addressing emergency measures in case of unintentional transboundary movements of LMOs that are likely to have significant adverse effect on biological diversity?
  • Yes
100. Does your country have the capacity to take appropriate measures in the event that an LMO is unintentionally released?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.8.3 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
101. In the current reporting period, how many times has your country received information concerning occurrences that led, or may have led, to unintentional transboundary movement(s) of one or more LMOs to or from territories under its jurisdiction?
  • Never
105. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 17 in your country
The Ministry of Agriculture, as required by the State Council, has developed a programme for emergency response in relation to the biosafety management of agricultural GMOs. The agriculture departments at the provincial, municipal and county level have also developed their response programmes appropriate to their local circumstances in accordance with the national programme and the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs.
Article 18 – Handling, transport, packaging and identification
106. Has your country taken measures to require that LMOs that are subject to transboundary movement are handled, packaged and transported under conditions of safety, taking into account relevant international rules and standards?
  • Yes
107. Has your country taken measures to require that documentation accompanying LMOs-FFP clearly identifies that, in cases where the identity of the LMOs is not known through means such as identity preservation systems, they may contain living modified organisms and are not intended for intentional introduction into the environment, as well as a contact point for further information?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.6.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
108. Has your country taken measures to require that documentation accompanying LMOs-FFP clearly identifies that, in cases where the identity of the LMOs is known through means such as identity preservation systems, they contain living modified organisms and are not intended for intentional introduction into the environment, as well as a contact point for further information?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.6.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
The Rules for the Safety Administration of Import of Agricultural GMOs require the submission of the import safety registration form and other relevant materials when a safety certificate is applied for the import of GMOs intended for use as processing raw materials.
109. If you answered Yes or Yes, to some extent to question(s) 107 and/or 108, what type of documentation does your country require for the identification of LMOs-FFP?
  • Existing or a stand-alone document
110. Has your country taken measures to require that documentation accompanying LMOs that are destined for contained use clearly identifies them as living modified organisms and specifies any requirements for the safe handling, storage, transport and use, the contact point for further information, including the name and address of the individual and institution to whom the LMO are consigned?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.6.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
There are provisions in the Rules for Labeling of Agricultural GMOs.
111. If you answered Yes or Yes, to some extent to question 110, what type of documentation does your country require for the identification of LMOs that are destined for contained?
  • Existing or a stand-alone document
112. Has your country taken measures to require that documentation accompanying LMOs that are intended for intentional introduction into the environment of the Party of import, clearly identifies them as living modified organisms; specifies the identity and relevant traits and/or characteristics, any requirements for the safe handling, storage, transport and use, the contact point for further information and, as appropriate, the name and address of the importer and exporter; and contains a declaration that the movement is in conformity with the requirements of this Protocol applicable to the exporter?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.6.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes, to some extent
For imported GMOs, the Rules for Labeling of Agricultural GMOs require the provision of relevant information specified in the information feedback form for the imported agricultural GMOs.
113. If you answered Yes or Yes, to some extent to question 112, what type of documentation does your country require for the identification of LMOs that are intended for intentional introduction into the environment?
  • Existing or a stand-alone document
114. Does your country have available any guidance for the purpose of ensuring the safe handling, transport, and packaging of living modified organisms?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.6.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
115. Does your country have the capacity to enforce the requirements of identification and documentation of LMOs?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
The Rules for Labeling of Agricultural GMOs require labeling of five categories of GM products. A number of testing methods and standards have been issued one after another for this purpose, and a system of labs for testing GM products has been also established in the agriculture, SAQSIQ and other sectors.
116. How many customs officers in your country have received training in the identification of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.3.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • 100 or more
117. Has your country established procedures for the sampling and detection of LMOs?
  • Yes
118. How many laboratory personnel in your country have received training in detection of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.3.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • 100 or more
119. Does your country have reliable access to laboratory facilities for the detection of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.3.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
120. How many laboratories in your country are certified for LMO detection?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.3.3 of the Strategic Plan
  • 50 or more
121. How many of the certified laboratories in the previous question are currently operating in the detection of LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.3.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • 50 or more
122. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 18 in your country:
The Ministry of Agriculture has developed the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs, the Rules for Agricultural GMO Labeling and a national standard for labeling of agricultural GMOs. The MOA has established a National Committee on Technical Standards for Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs, which is composed of 41 experts. So far 151 biosafety standards for GMOs have been issued, including technical regulations for environmental safety testing of GM soybeans, maize and rapeseed; and general standards for detecting GM plants and their products; as well as a series of technical standards for DNA purification and extraction, sampling and composition detection. 42 institutions undertaking agricultural product quality supervision and testing have been accredited to detect GM composition and test the environmental and food safety. At present the MOA is setting up a system for tracing GM products to ensure that the whole cycle of GM products from production to consumption will be under control.
The labs in the system of SAQSIQ can do the testing of GMOs as they are accredited by China National Accreditation Service for Conformity Assessment (CNAS). About 100 labs have participated in the testing of LMOs.
The Regulation on Labeling of Agricultural GMOs applies to the imported agricultural GMOs or those already placed on the market. For the imported GMOs, the importer is required to provide relevant information specified in the form filled for the import. Meanwhile GM labeling is required only for those products placed on the market. Article 16 of the Regulation on Food Labeling issued in 2009 requires instructions in Chinese on the labels for GM products or products that contain GM components.
The revised Food Safety Law of the People's Republic of China has been adopted at the 14th session of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress on 24 April 2015 and has been effective from 1 October 2015.Among others, Article 69 requires that the manufacturers and the business operators of GM food shall put obvious labels on their products. Article 125 provides that "those producing and doing business in GM food, in case of the failure to label their products as required, will be confiscated of illegal income earned, food and food additives being produced and used, as well as the tools, equipment, raw materials and other things used for illegal production and business. In the case that the value of food and food additives being produced and used is less than 10,000 yuan RMB, a fine exceeding 5,000 yuan and lower than 50,000 yuan will be given. In the case that the value is higher than 10,000 yuan, a fine five times as much but lower than ten times as much will be given. In serious cases the manufacturer or business operator will be ordered to stop production or business until their business licenses are suspended".
Article 19 – Competent National Authorities and National Focal Points
123. In case your country has designated more than one competent national authority, has your country established a mechanism for the coordination of their actions prior to taking decisions regarding LMOs?
  • Yes
124. Has your country established adequate institutional capacity to enable the competent national authority(ies) to perform the administrative functions required by the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
The Inter-ministerial Committee on Biosafety of Agricultural GMOs has been established to study and coordinate on major issues related to the biosafety administration of agricultural GMOs.
125. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 19 in your country
An Inter-ministerial Committee on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs was established, which is led by the Ministry of Agriculture and composed of 11 ministries and departments, such as the National Commission on Development and Reform, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Ministry of Commerce, National Health and Family Planning Commission (Ministry of Health then), State Administration of Industry and Commerce, SAQSIQ, China Food and Drug Administration and SFA. This Committee is responsible for reviewing and coordinating major issues related to biosafety management of agricultural GMOs. However relevant competent authorities responsible for biosafety management of GMOs need to further improve relevant mechanisms and systems in particular relation to decision-making, coordination and information sharing, which is conducive to promoting the implementation of the Biosafety Protocol in China.
Article 20 – Information Sharing and the Biosafety Clearing-House (BCH)
126. Please provide an overview of the status of the mandatory information provided by your country to the BCH by specifying for each category of information whether it is available and whether it has been submitted to the BCH.
This question is relevant to indicator 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
a) Existing national legislation, regulations and guidelines for implementing the Protocol, as well as information required by Parties for the advance informed agreement procedure (Article 20, paragraph 3 (a))
  • Information available and in the BCH
b) National laws, regulations and guidelines applicable to the import of LMOs intended for direct use as food or feed, or for processing (Article 11, paragraph 5)
  • Information available and in the BCH
c) Bilateral, multilateral and regional agreements and arrangements (Articles 14, paragraph 2 and 20, paragraph 3 (b))
  • Information not available
d) Contact details for competent national authorities (Article 19, paragraphs 2 and 3), national focal points (Article 19, paragraphs 1 and 3), and emergency contacts (Article 17, paragraph 3 (e))
  • Information available and in the BCH
e) Reports submitted by the Parties on the operation of the Protocol (Article 20, paragraph 3 (e))
  • Information available and in the BCH
f) Decisions by a Party on regulating the transit of specific living modified organisms (LMOs) (Article 6, paragraph 1)
  • Information not available
g) Occurrence of unintentional transboundary movements that are likely to have significant adverse effects on biological diversity (Article 17, paragraph 1)
  • Information not available
h) Illegal transboundary movements of LMOs (Article 25, paragraph 3)
  • Information available but not in the BCH
i) Final decisions regarding the importation or release of LMOs (i.e. approval or prohibition, any conditions, requests for further information, extensions granted, reasons for decision) (Articles 10, paragraph 3 and 20, paragraph 3(d))
  • Information available but not in the BCH
j) Information on the application of domestic regulations to specific imports of LMOs (Article 14, paragraph 4)
  • Information not available
k) Final decisions regarding the domestic use of LMOs that may be subject to transboundary movement for direct use as food or feed, or for processing (Article 11, paragraph 1)
  • Information available but not in the BCH
l) Final decisions regarding the import of LMOs intended for direct use as food or feed, or for processing that are taken under domestic regulatory frameworks (Article 11, paragraph 4) or in accordance with annex III (Article 11, paragraph 6) (requirement of Article 20, paragraph 3(d))
  • Information available but not in the BCH
m) Declarations regarding the framework to be used for LMOs intended for direct use as food or feed, or for processing (Article 11, paragraph 6)
  • Information available and in the BCH
n) Review and change of decisions regarding intentional transboundary movements of LMOs (Article 12, paragraph 1)
  • Information not available
o) LMOs granted exemption status by each Party (Article 13, paragraph 1)
  • Information not available
p) Cases where intentional transboundary movement may take place at the same time as the movement is notified to the Party of import (Article 13, paragraph 1)
  • Information not available
q) Summaries of risk assessments or environmental reviews of LMOs generated by regulatory processes and relevant information regarding products thereof (Article 20, paragraph 3 (c))
  • Information available but not in the BCH
127. Has your country established a mechanism for strengthening the capacity of the BCH National Focal Point to perform its administrative functions?
  • Yes
128. Has your country established a mechanism for the coordination among the BCH National Focal Point, the Cartagena Protocol focal point, and the competent national authority(ies) for making information available to the BCH?
  • Yes
129. Does your country use the information available in the BCH in its decision making processes on LMOs?
  • Yes, in some cases
130. Has your country experienced difficulties accessing or using the BCH?
This question is relevant to indicator 4.1.8 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
Here you may provide further details
The differences in mechanisms of information exchange, categories of materials needed and the format of reports caused some difficulties in using the BCH.
131. Is the information submitted by your country to the BCH complete and up-to date?
  • No
132. Please indicate the number of regional, national and international events organized in relation to biosafety (e.g. seminars, workshops, press conferences, educational events, etc.,) in the last 2 years:
This question is relevant to indicator 4.3.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • 5 or more
133. Please indicate the number of biosafety related publications that has been made available in your country in the last year:
This question is relevant to indicator 4.3.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • 10 or more
134. If biosafety related publications were made available (see question above), please indicate which modalities were preferred:
This question is relevant to indicator 4.3.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • National Libraries
135. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 20 in your country
National, regional and international activities related to biosafety organized in the past two years include:
In May 2013, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences of MEP, China Central University of Nationalities and the Third World Network (TWN), in collaboration with the Ecology and Nature Conservation Sub-Committee of the Chinese Society of Environmental Sciences, the Ethnic Ecology Committee of China Ecology Society and the Research Institute of Environment and Resource Protection for Ethnic Minority Areas in China, organized the 5th International Forum on Biosafety in Beijing, China. 65 representatives from many countries and relevant international organizations attended this forum. 
In March 2014, experts from MOA attended a technical consultation meeting organized by UNFAO on the issue of low level mixture of GM crops in the international trade in food and feed.
In August 2012 and December 2014, National Symposium on Biosafety were held respectively in Ningxia University and Nanjing University. More than 170 persons from universities, research institutions and experts in the field of biotechnology and biosafety attended these symposium.
In March 2014, Mr. Han Changfu, Minister of Agriculture, together with Mr. Bi Jiamei, Chief Economist and Press Secretary of MOA, answered questions from domestic and international journalists concerning food security, food safety, GM crops and other issues at one of the press conferences organized by the News Center of the Second Annual Session of the 12th National People's Congress.
In February 2015, the Information Office of the State Council held a press conference for disseminating and explaining a number of recommendations for reinforcing reforms and innovation to enhance agricultural modernization. Among others, it was clearly pointed out that China would strengthen research in GM biotechnology, biosafety management and related science knowledge dissemination to enhance public and media understanding of GM technologies and products.
Biosafety-related publications since 2014 include:
Yang, Qingping, "Explaining GMOs", Henan People's Press, 1 January 2014
Dong, Renwei, "Talks on GM Technologies", Science Popularization Press, 1 January 2014
Xue, Dayuan, "Proceedings of the 5th International Forum on Biosafety-Risk Assessment and Management", Environmental Sciences Press, 1 May 2014
Kou, Jianping, "100 Questions on Agricultural GM Technologies" (2nd edition), China Agriculture Press, 1 June 2014
Xue, Dayuan, "Biosafety Management of GMOs" (English version), Sciences Press, 30 June 2014
Luo, Chengbing & Shao Junhui, "Studies on Legal Frameworks for GM Food Safety", Jilin People's Press, 1 July 2014
Office of Inter-ministerial Committee on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs, "Reasonable Attitude towards GMOs", Sciences Popularization Press, 1 August 2014
Zhou, Yunlong, "Development and Application of Reference Materials for GMOs", China Quality Inspection Press, 1 August 2014
Office of Inter-ministerial Committee on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs, "Overview of GM Food Safety", China Agriculture Press, 1 October 2014
Chinese Translation by Yu Meilian, "Demystifying GMOs", Shanghai Science and Technology Press, 1 May 2015.
Currently the main barrier to the submission and sharing of biosafety-related information is the scattering of relevant information in different departments, so communication, coordination, information collection and submission requires considerable time. In the future relevant competent authorities of China need to further enhance their connection with the central website of the BCH.
Article 21 – Confidential information
136. Has your country established procedures to protect confidential information received under the Protocol?
  • Yes
137. Does your country allow the notifier to identify information that is to be treated as confidential?
  • Yes, always
138. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 21 in your country
The relevant competent authorities responsible for the biosafety management of GMOs protect the legal rights and interests of the applicants by strictly following the requirements in relevant laws and regulations.
Article 4 (Management of Technical Testing) of the Rules for Risk Assessment of Agricultural GMOs provides that MOA can entrust technical testing of agricultural GMOs based on the needs for their risk assessments and management requirements to those agencies or institutions capable of undertaking such testing, and the testing agency or institution entrusted to test shall protect the technological and commercial secrets of the applicant and its agent. Article 27 also provides that personnel of the bodies reviewing and approving risk assessments and experts involved in the reviews shall protect the technological and commercial secrets of the applicant, and those having relatives doing business in relevant fields should not be involved due to conflict of interest.
Article 22 – Capacity-building
139. Does your country have predictable and reliable funding for building capacity for the effective implementation of the Protocol?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.6 and 3.1.8 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
140. Has your country received external support or benefited from collaborative activities with other Parties in the development and/or strengthening of human resources and institutional capacities in biosafety?
  • Yes
141. If you answered Yes to question 140, how were these resources made available?
  • Bilateral channels
142. Has your country provided support to other Parties in the development and/or strengthening of human resources and institutional capacities in biosafety?
  • Yes
143. If you answered Yes to question 142, how were these resources made available?
  • Bilateral channels
144. Has your country ever initiated a process to access GEF funds for building capacity in biosafety?
  • Yes
145. If you answered Yes to question 144, how would you characterize the process?
Please add further details about your experience in accessing GEF funds under question 157.
  • Average
146. Has your country ever received funding from the GEF for building capacity in biosafety?
  • Development of national biosafety frameworks
  • Implementation of national biosafety frameworks
  • Building Capacity for Effective Participation in the BCH (Phase I)
  • Building Capacity for Effective Participation in the BCH (Phase II)
147. During the current reporting period, has your country undertaken activities for the development and/or strengthening of human resources and institutional capacities in biosafety?
  • Yes
148. If you answered Yes to question 147, in which of the following areas were these activities undertaken?
  • Institutional capacity
  • Human resources capacity development and training
  • Risk assessment and other scientific and technical expertise
  • Risk management
  • Public awareness, participation and education in biosafety
  • Information exchange and data management including participation in the Biosafety Clearing-House
  • Scientific, technical and institutional collaboration at subregional, regional and international levels
  • Identification of LMOs, including their detection
  • Socio-economic considerations
  • Measures to address unintentional and/or illegal transboundary movements of LMOs
  • Scientific biosafety research relating to LMOs
  • Taking into account risks to human health
149. During the current reporting period, has your country carried out a capacity-building needs assessment?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
151. Does your country still have capacity-building needs?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.7 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
152. If you answered Yes to question 151, indicate which of the following areas still need capacity-building.
  • Institutional capacity
  • Human resources capacity development and training
  • Risk assessment and other scientific and technical expertise
  • Risk management
  • Public awareness, participation and education in biosafety
  • Information exchange and data management including participation in the Biosafety Clearing-House
  • Scientific, technical and institutional collaboration at subregional, regional and international levels
  • Identification of LMOs, including their detection
  • Socio-economic considerations
  • Measures to address unintentional and/or illegal transboundary movements of LMOs
  • Scientific biosafety research relating to LMOs
  • Taking into account risks to human health
153. Has your country developed a capacity-building strategy or action plan?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
154. Does your country have in place a functional national mechanism for coordinating biosafety capacity-building initiatives?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
155. How many biosafety short-term training programmes and/or academic courses are offered annually in your country?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.3 of the Strategic Plan
  • 10 per year or more
156. Has your country submitted the details of national biosafety experts to the Roster of Experts in the BCH?
  • No
157. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 22 in your country, including further details about your experience in accessing GEF funds
Many research and development projects related to GMO development and risk assessments have been undertaken since the tenth five-year plan period (2001-2005). These projects were included in the national plan for key fundamental research and development (973), national plan for high-tech development (863), special project on GM plant research and commercialization undertaken by China Natural Sciences Foundation and the Ministry of Science and Technology, national project on development of new varieties of GMOs and relevant plans of the MOA and SAQSIQ. These projects have not only upgraded China's capacities in research and risk assessments but also reinforced infrastructure of GMO labs.
The Ministry of Environmental Protection organizes training workshops for environmental managers on the biosafety management of GMOs every year. During 2012-2015, more than 100 managers were trained. The Key lab on biosafety of Environmental Protection received an investment of over 15 million yuan RMB (over 2 million USD) during the twelfth five-year plan period (2012-2015). These funds were used for building bases, improving conditions of labs and purchasing equipment and instruments needed.
The Ministry of Agriculture organizes every year training workshops for local agricultural departments and personnel involved in testing on the biosafety supervision of agricultural GMOs. The number of persons trained in total has surpassed 800. Meanwhile, the MOA also strengthened capacities for testing by upgrading testing equipment and capacities of personnel involved, as well as developing and issuing many standards for testing and risk assessments.
National Health and Family Planning Commission has provided adequate lab equipment and facilities for biosafety management as required by relevant laws and regulations, strengthened training and examination on relevant knowledge and skills for professionals at various levels and for lab managers before they take the job, and actively participated in international exchanges in the field of biosafety.
SAQSIQ has invested considerable human, financial and technical resources into the development of a series of technical standards for biosafety management and guidelines for testing, the establishment of labs undertaking verification of GM composition and the provision of relevant equipment and instruments. SAQSIQ has organized seminars and training workshops on sampling and testing of GMOs and for relevant personnel involved.
SFA has organized training workshops on forestry-related biosafety issues or lectures on particular issues related to biosafety, providing training to biosafety managers and scientists within the forestry sector. The total number of persons trained has surpassed 300.
State Administration of Customs also provides training on law enforcement for on-site checking personnel on a regular basis, with a view to equipping them with relevant technical knowledge and upgrading their level of accuracy in inspection and verification.
China has actively supported research activities with other Parties in the field of biosafety management as well as capacity building in this regard. For example, China National Natural Sciences Foundation and Austrian Natural Sciences Foundation have jointly supported the research in biosafety management related to synthetic biology (January 2009 to December 2011).
Article 23 – Public awareness and participation
158. Has your country established a strategy or put in place legislation for promoting and facilitating public awareness, education and participation concerning the safe transfer, handling and use of LMOs?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
Document NO.1 of the Central Government in 2015 indicated that  strengthening the technology research, safety management and science popularization of agricultural genetically modified organisms is the developing strategy of transgenic technology at present.
159. Has your country designed and/or implemented an outreach/communication strategy on biosafety?
This question is relevant to indicator 5.3.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
160. Does your country have any awareness and outreach programmes on biosafety?
This question is relevant to indicator 5.3.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
161. If you answered Yes to question 160, please indicate what entity is responsible for carrying out the programmes and/or services and at which level the programmes take place (e.g. local, national, etc.):
This question is relevant to indicator 5.3.1 of the Strategic Plan
In 2012, Jiaotong University of Shanghai established an educational and science popularization base for GMOs, which is open to the public all the year round, and this Base organizes awareness and science popularization activities on a regular basis as well as training workshops on GMO testing. This Base also organizes activities and summer camps as part of National and Municipal Week of Science Popularization and Science Popularization Day with a view to deepening public understanding of agricultural GMOs and enhancing public knowledge of GM technologies and their products.
State Administration of Customs organized educational activities on biosafety issues and relevant laws and regulations by using social media and bulletins for law enforcement, with a view to raising awareness of international travelers, in particular scientists and personnel involved in foreign affairs, of related biodiversity issues. National Health and Family Planning Commission also developed plans of training for lab workers on knowledge and skills of biosafety, as required by relevant laws and regulations, and required biosafety management bodies in all the labs to implement these plans.
A research topic on communication, science popularization, training and demonstration base related to GM food safety has been included in the 2014 major programme on GM research and development with a view to further enhancing science popularization level related to GM technologies in China, strengthening communication between governments, companies, research institutions and the general public, as well as increasing the scientific and objective understanding of the general public of biosafety of GMOs. The central government investment in this regard has exceeded one million yuan and the implementation period is from 2014 to 2016.
162. Has your country established a biosafety website searchable archives, national resource centres or sections in existing national libraries dedicated to biosafety educational materials?
This question is relevant to indicators 2.5.3 and 5.3.3 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
163. How many collaborative initiatives (including joint activities) on the Cartagena Protocol and other Conventions and processes has your government established in the last 4 years?
This question is relevant to indicator 5.2.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • One or more
164. Has your country established a mechanism to ensure public access to information on living modified organisms that may be imported?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
Information concerning the approval of LMOs for import has been made available on the website of the Ministry of Agriculture.
165. Has your country established a mechanism to consult the public in the decision-making process regarding LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.5.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
166. Has your country established a mechanism to make available to the public the results of decisions taken on LMOs?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.5.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
The approval results are made available on relevant websites.
167. Has your country informed the public about existing modalities for public participation in the decision-making process regarding living modified organisms?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.5.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
170. Has your country taken any initiative to inform its public about the means of public access to the Biosafety Clearing-House?
  • Yes
171. How many academic institutions in your country are offering biosafety education and training courses and programmes?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.7.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • 10 or more
172. Please indicate the number of educational materials and/or online modules on biosafety that are available and accessible to the public in your country:
This question is relevant to indicators 2.7.2 and 5.3.4 of the Strategic Plan
  • 10 or more
173. In the current reporting period, has your country promoted and facilitated public awareness, education and participation concerning the safe transfer, handling and use of LMOs?
  • Yes
174. If you answered Yes to question 173, has your country cooperated with other States and international bodies?
  • Yes
175. In the current reporting period, how many times has your country consulted the public in the decision-making process regarding LMOs and made the results of such decisions available to the public?
  • Never
176. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 23 in your country
With regard to public education,  institutions of higher education under the Ministry of Education have established majors or programmes on biosafety for undergraduates and training of professionals for biosafety management. For example, Southwest University, Sichuan University, Nanjing University, Hunan Agricultural University, Fujian University of Agriculture and Forestry have established undergraduate programmes on biosafety. Among them, Hunan Agricultural University has established a college of science and technology for biosafety. Zhejiang University and Yangzhou University have opened courses on GM biosafety. Shenzhen University opened an optional course on "biosafety and human life". In addition, the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences has set up a postgraduate programme on biosafety of genetic modification, with a view to training professionals for tracing, testing, and assessing risks of GMOs. Fujian University of Agriculture and Forestry and East China Insect Society have jointly published "A Journal of Biosafety", which is intended to promote information exchange and research in the field of biosafety.
In 2012, Jiaotong University of Shanghai, China Agriculture University, R & D Center of MOA, Institute of Plant Protection of CAAS, Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety under China Disease Prevention and Control Center have jointly established a collaborative innovation center for GM biosafety. The innovation center strengthens professional talent training, disciplinary development and scientific research, with focus on major biosafety issues related to the new GM varieties and blastogenesis and needs for development of new GM varieties. This center has created a unique innovation system with the Chinese characteristics and the world-class level through combination of the above three functions-talent education, disciplinary development and research.
The agrogene network (http://www.agrogene.cn) established in June 2013 communicates information related to agricultural biotechnology development, reports in a timely manner events related to GM technologies and disseminates knowledge related to GMOs, through on-site reporting, internet advertising, social media interaction and organizing off-line activities.  Technical support and website content for this network are provided by China Society of Biological Engineering, China Plant Protection Society, China Crops Society, China Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology Society, Beijing Zhongguancun Alliance of Agricultural Biotechnological Industries and Capital Alliance of Seed Industry Service and Innovation.
Though China is not yet to establish mechanisms for public awareness and participation in the field of biosafety, various competent authorities have increased their investments in this regard and organized various kinds of educational and exchange activities to meet the increasing public needs for knowledge of biosafety in recent years.
The MOA organizes annually training workshops on biosafety supervision of agricultural GMOs, providing training to local agriculture departments and relevant testing personnel with a view to improving their management level and technical capacities. Meanwhile the MOA uses various means to disseminate to the public knowledge related to GMOs and biosafety. The MOA website has opened a portal "Focus on GMOs" (http://www.moa.gov.cn/ztzl/zjygwgz) where the policies and regulations related to biosafety of agricultural GMOs, standards and guidelines for risk assessments, testing agencies, rules of procedures and composition of the Committee of Biosafety of Agricultural GMOs as well as GMO approval results are published. Knowledge related to GMOs is popularized through short movies on TV, pictures and videos. The Agricultural GMO Biosafety Management Office under the MOA has developed a series of materials for popularizing knowledge related to GM technologies, including "Three Decades of Genetic Modification", "100 Questions on Agricultural GMOs", "Overview of GM Food Safety", "Do you know me, pictures on agricultural GMOs", and "Pictorial Explanation for Book 'Reasonable Attitude towards GMOs'".
In April 2012, the MOA Department of Science and Education, organized a national training workshop for journalists on biosafety management of GMOs, in collaboration with China Society of Science Editors and Journalists of Evening Newspapers, China Journal of Health Standard and Management, Shanghai Municipal Society of Science Communication and Beijing Association of Science Journalists and Editors. Nearly one hundred editors and journalists from major national media attended this training workshop.
In February 2014, the MOA issued a list of priorities for 2014 for the work of agricultural science and education, the environment and energy. One of the priorities was to strengthen supervision over GMOs and science popularization. In September of the same year, the MOA organized many communication and training activities focusing on knowledge related to agricultural GMOs.                                                                
S & T Channel at http://www.people.com.cn organized in 2013 four panel discussions on GMO-related sciences. Scientists undertaking GMO research and experts of biosafety management were invited to answer questions focusing on four topics including GMO sciences and safety, GM food safety, GMOs in foreign countries and whether GMOs are breakers of ecological balance.
Article 24 – Non-Parties
177. Has your country entered into any bilateral, regional, or multilateral agreement with non-Parties regarding transboundary movements of LMOs?
  • No
178. Has your country ever imported LMOs from a non-Party?
  • Yes
179. Has your country ever exported LMOs to a non-Party?
  • No
180. If you answered Yes to questions 178 or 179, were the transboundary movements of LMOs consistent with the objective of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety?
  • Yes
181. If you answered Yes to questions 178 or 179, was information about these transboundary movements submitted to the BCH?
  • No
183. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 24 in your country:
None.
Article 25 – Illegal transboundary movements
184. Has your country adopted domestic measures aimed at preventing and/or penalizing transboundary movements of LMOs carried out in contravention of its domestic measures to implement this Protocol?
  • Yes
185. Has your country established a strategy for detecting illegal transboundary movements of LMOs?
  • Yes
186. In the current reporting period, how many times has your country received information concerning cases of illegal transboundary movements of an LMO to or from territories under its jurisdiction?
If you replied Never to question 186 please go to question 191
  • More than 10
187. If your country received information concerning cases of illegal transboundary movements of an LMO in the current reporting period, has your country informed the BCH and the other Party(ies) involved?
This question is relevant to indicators 3.1.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
188. If your country received information concerning cases of illegal transboundary movements of an LMO in the current reporting period, has your country established the origin of the LMO(s)?
  • Yes
189. If your country received information concerning cases of illegal transboundary movements of an LMO in the current reporting period, has your country established the nature of the LMO(s)?
  • Yes, some cases
190. If your country received information concerning cases of illegal transboundary movements of an LMO in the current reporting period, has your country established the circumstances of the illegal transboundary movement(s)?
  • Yes, some cases
191. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 25 in your country
Articles 6 and 7 in the Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs contain clear provisions concerning the supervision and inspection of GMOs and rules for penalties. The imported seeds in particular their uniqueness will be tested and their GM composition will be verified and identified based on relevant information provided by the exporter. In the case of the import of agricultural GMOs without the approval of the MOA or the provision of information inconsistent with the certificate or approval documents issued, the imported GMOs will be returned or destroyed in accordance with the Rules for Biosafety Management of the Import and Export of Agricultural GMOs.
In June 2012, SAQSIQ issued the rules for quarantine of carry-ons by international travelers, where agricultural GMOs are listed as one of the carry-ons that should be quarantined. The rules have been implemented since 1 November 2012.
SAQSIQ has established a system to track and oversee the risks related to the import and export of agricultural GM products, by sample screening and testing GM products,  and tracking the unintentional transboundary movement. In doing so, a number of cases of illegal transboundary transfer of GMOs and their products have been obtained, including afew below:
In September 2011, Shenzhen Luohu AQSIQ checkpoint intercepted maize seeds (a total of 25 bags weighing 250 kg) carried by "tour smugglers" going through the Hong Kong-Macao channel. It was found out that the maize seed belongs to the super sweet maize variety and named "CUPOLA", a kind of GM hybrid variety, which was developed by Synthega in its Idaho base. The checkpoint personnel confiscated and destroyed maize seeds because these "tour smugglers" did not show the approval document issued by the competent authorities of China and the certificate of plant quarantine officially issued by the USA.
In May 2013, Harbin AQSIQ intercepted 21 bags of maize seeds mailed from the USA, totaling 115 kg. The seeds were found to be GM after testing, and have been destroyed.
From October 2013 to December 2014,the inspection and quarantine administrations across the country tested a total of 2.863 million tons of maize imported from the USA. Among them, 924,600 tons of maize were found containing GM elements MIR162, which were not approved by China. Relevant SAQSIQ bodies have returned all of them to the exporter in accordance with relevant laws. SAQSIQ has informed relevant US authorities, and requested them to require the exporters to strengthen their pre-shipment checking to ensure that the imported maize will meet the relevant legal requirements and quality and safety standards of China.
An application for safety certificate was submitted for anti-insect maize MIR 162 for the first time in February 2010. An import safety certificate was issued in December 2014 following the review and examination of the Committee of Biosafety of Agricultural GMOs.
Article 26 – Socio-economic considerations
192. Does your country have any specific approaches or requirements that facilitate how socio-economic considerations should be taken into account in LMO decision making?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.7.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
193. If your country has taken a decision on import, has it ever taken into account socio-economic considerations arising from the impact of the LMO on the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity?
  • Only in some cases
194. How many peer-reviewed published materials has your country used for the purpose of elaborating or determining national actions with regard to socio-economic considerations?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.7.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • None
195. What is your country's experience, if any, in taking socio-economic considerations into account in LMO decision making? Please give details:
This question is relevant to indicator 1.7.3 of the Strategic Plan
The MOA takes into account socio-economic considerations when making decisions on agricultural GMOs. In issuing the safety certificate, the MOA requires the provision of comprehensive assessment reports for GMOs covering the impacts brought by the commercialization of GMOs on the society, economy, public opinion, trade and other aspects.
The SFA also takes into account socio-economic considerations when making decisions related to GM timber, however so far there are no written rules in this regard.
196. Has your country cooperated with other Parties on research and information exchange on any socio-economic impacts of LMOs?
  • Yes, to some extent
Here you may provide further details
See answers to Question 197.
197. Here you may provide further details on the implementation of Article 26 in your country
In recent years, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Renmin University, China Central University of Nationalities, China Agriculture  University and Central China Agriculture University have been undertaking some research on the socio-economic impacts of genetically modified cotton, maize, soybeans and rice. The CAS has included a research project on socio-economic impacts of agricultural GMOs in its major project on development of new GM varieties and innovation projects. National Natural Sciences Foundation has set up a research project on economic impacts of GM crops and development strategy. The Institute of Agricultural Economy and Development under the CAAS also established a research project on the impacts of the commercialization of GM maize. A few other projects are supported by International Development Research Certre (IDRC), the Rockefeller Foundation and Oxfam. The institutions involved in these projects include the Institute of Geology and Resources of CAS, Research Center on Agricultural Policies of CAS, CAAS, China Agriculture University, Foreign Economic Cooperation Centre of MOA, Fudan University, Cornell University, Stanford University, Tokyo University, and the Center for International Cooperation on Agricultural Research and Development of France.
Article 27 – Liability and Redress
198. Has your country ratified or acceded to the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress?
  • No
199. If you answered No to question 198, is there any national process in place towards becoming a Party?
  • Yes
200. Has your country received any financial and/or technical assistance for capacity-building in the area of liability and redress relating to living modified organisms?
This question is relevant to indicator 2.4.1 of the Strategic Plan
  • No
201. Does your country have administrative or legal instrument that provide for response measures for damage to biodiversity resulting from living modified organisms?
This question is relevant to indicators 1.5.2 and 2.4.2 of the Strategic Plan
  • Yes
202. Here you may provide further details on any activities undertaken in your country towards the implementation of the Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress
The Government of China is studying the rights, obligations and rules related to the Supplementary Protocol. China, as a biodiversity rich country and the most populous developing country, will ensure its ecological security while developing its economy. A number of departments are involved in the biosafety management of LMOs and they have established a number of regulations and rules in this regard. The Ministry of Environmental Protection is taking the lead in coordinating and communicating with various departments with regard to the ratification of the Supplementary Protocol and will undertake initial studies in this regard.
Article 28 – Financial Mechanism and Resources
203. How much additional funding (in the equivalent of US dollars) has your country mobilized in the last four years to support implementation of the Biosafety Protocol, beyond the regular national budgetary allocation?
This question is relevant to indicator 1.2.5 of the Strategic Plan
  • Not applicable
Article 33 – Monitoring and reporting
204. Does your country have in place a monitoring and/or an enforcement system for the implementation of the Cartagena Protocol?
This question is relevant to indicator 3.1.6 of the Strategic Plan
a) Monitoring system:
  • Yes
b) Enforcement system:
  • Yes
205. Has your country submitted all the previous due National Reports?
  • Yes
Other information
184. Please use this field to provide any other information on issues related to national implementation of the Protocol, including any obstacles or impediments encountered.
Annex I

Postscript

The third national report of China on the implementation of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety ("the Protocol" thereafter) was developed by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) in collaboration with relevant departments and other institutions, as required by Article 33 of the Protocol and COP-MOP decision BS-VII/14.

While this report was developed, workshops were organized during which experts from related fields discussed the issues related to the third national report and its initial drafts. Inputs were sought from relevant departments involved in biosafety management. Based on this the third national report was revised and adjusted. The final report was approved and launched by the MEP.

The Department of Ecology and Nature Conservation of the MEP initiated the process of the preparation of the report in May 2015. The process went through the following steps:

1. Development of a work plan and identification of tasks

In May 2015, as requested by the National Biosafety Management Office of the MEP, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences of the MEP conducted studies in preparation for the report and developed a work plan. The plan identified the organization of the report, planned activities, technical work needed and milestones.

The preparation of the report was led by China Coordinating Group for the Implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity ("the Coordinating Group" thereafter) and involved 11 departments including the Ministry of Environmental Protection, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Agriculture, the National Health and Family Planning Commission, the State Administration of Customs, the State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, the State Forestry Administration, China Food and Drug Administration(The Office of the State Council Committee for Food Safety) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.  The preparation of the report was coordinated by the Department of Ecology and Nature Conservation of the MEP, and implemented by Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences. The MEP, members of the Coordinating Group and relevant research institutions were all involved to ensure that all relevant stakeholders contributed to the preparation of the report. All relevant departments provided active support to the process by recommending experts as requested.

2. Initiation of project, information collection and drafting the report

On 4 June 2015, the Department of Ecology and Nature Conservation of the MEP organized a meeting to initiate the preparation of the report. All relevant departments sent their representatives to this meeting. A liaison group was formed and composed of representatives from the Ministry of Environmental Protection, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Agriculture, the National Health and Family Planning Commission, the State Administration of Customs, the State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, the State Forestry Administration, China Food and Drug Administration (The Office of the State Council Committee for Food Safety) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. At this meeting tasks were assigned to related departments, with milestones identified.

3. Holding expert group meetings to draft the third national report

On 15 June 2015, following the recommendations of the liaison group, a report drafting group was formed and involved experts from Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences of the MEP, Institute of Biotechnologies of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Chinese Research Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Chinese Academy of Forestry, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, National Food Safety Supervision and Inspection Center, Zhejiang University and Institute of Botany ofCAS. Tasks were assigned to relevant experts according to the work plan. After the meeting all the experts involved did research on work undertaken by various sectors, compiled measures taken by China to implement related provisions and COP-MOP decisions, analyzed the achievements, experiences and lessons learned as well as challenges and difficulties encountered and provided sectoral draft reports.

4. Undertaking off-line discussions and revising the third national report

In July and August 2015, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences of the MEP compiled all the sectoral reports and developed an initial draft of the third national report. Through phone calls and email exchanges, the expert group provided comments and suggestions on the initial draft and as a result, the first draft was ready for consultation.

5. Consulting with relevant departments

In September 2015, the Department of Ecology and Nature Conservation revised and improved the draft report through consultations with relevant departments involved in the preparation of the report.

6. Holding a meeting of the liaison group to review the third national report

On 29 September 2015, the liaison group meeting was held in Beijing to review the third national report. All relevant departments provided their comments and suggestions to the finalization of the report.

7. Finalization, translation and submission of the third national report

In October 2015, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences further improved the third national report based on comments and feedback from relevant departments and formed the report that could be presented for approval. In late October, the third national report was translated into English. The Department of Ecology and Nature Conservation had reviewed the report and submitted the report for final approval. Before 30 October 2015 the Ministry of Environmental Protection submitted the final third national report to the Secretariat in both Chinese and English.

Departments and Institutions Involved in the Preparation of the Report:

Ministry of Environmental Protection, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Agriculture, National Health and Family Planning Commission, State Administration of Customs, State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, State Forestry Administration, China Food and Drug Administration (The Office of the State Council Committee for Food Safety) , Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences of the MEP, Institute of Biotechnologies of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Chinese Research Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Chinese Academy of Forestry, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, National Food Safety Supervision and Inspection Center, Zhejiang University and Institute of Botany ofCAS.

REFERENCES

1. State Forestry Administration. "Rules for Monitoring of Biosafety of GM Timber". December 2013.
2. Ministry of Agriculture. "MOA Programme of Work for Biosafety Supervision of Agricultural GMOs for 2015". February 2015.
3. MOA Bulletin No. 2147. "On-line Administrative Approval of Applications related to Agricultural GMOs". August 2014.
4. Food Safety Law of the People's Republic of China. October 2015.
5. State Commission on Health and Family Planning. "Guidelines for Biosafety of Clinical Trials". December 2014.
6. Regulation on Biosafety Management of Agricultural GMOs (revised in accordance with the State Council Order No.588). January 2011.
7. MOA Bulletin No.1693. "Application Procedure for Risk Assessment of GM Insect Tolerant Cotton and Certificate of Safety". December 2011.
8. MOA Bulletin No.1782. "Composition Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-PCR Methods for Determining Insecticide Tolerant Soybeans 356043 and Derivatives" and 12 other national standards. June 2012.
9. MOA Bulletin No. 1861. "Composition Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-PCR Methods for Determining Standard Rice Genes" and 5 other national standards. November 2012.
10. MOA Bulletin 1943. "Composition Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-PCR Methods for Determining Standard Cotton Genes" and 3 other national standards. May 2013.
11. MOA Bulletin No. 2031. "Environmental Safety Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-Part I. Herbicide Tolerant Soybeans: Tolerance of Herbicide" and 18 other national standards. December 2013.
12. MOA Bulletin No.2122. "Composition Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-PCR Methods for Determining Pig Genes" and 15 other national standards. July 2014.
13. MOA Bulletin No. 2259. "Composition Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-Technical Guidelines for Valuation of Reference Materials" and 18 other national standards. May 2015.
14. SAQSIQ Bulletin No 237 (2012). "Methods for Risk Assessment of LMOs". May 2012.
15. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 643 (2012). "Procedures for Inspection of Imported and Exported GM Plants and Their Products". October 2012.
16. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 777 (2012). "Regulations on biosafety management of imported GM micro-organisms for industrial uses" and 1 other sectoral standard. December 2012.
17. SAQSIQ Bulletin No.123 (2013). "PCR Methods for Screening of GM Animals and Their Products" and 6 other sectoral standards. March 2013.
18. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 464 (2013). "PCR-DHPLC Methods for Testing GM Rice" and 1 other sectoral standard. August 2013.
19. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 23 (2014). "LAMP Methods for Testing GM Composition of Exported Rice" and 30 other sectoral standards. January 2014.
20. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 210 (2014). "Composition Testing of GM Plants and Their Products-Methods of Sampling and Sample Preparation" and 1 other sectoral standard. April 2014.
21. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 614 (2014). "PCR Testing Methods for GM Composition in Feed". November 2014.
22. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 59 (2015). PCR Testing Methods for GM Composition of Pigs and Their Products". February 2015.
23. National Standard Bulletin No. 19 (2015). Joint Issuance by SAQSIQ and National Standardization Committee. "Film Chip Testing Methods of GM Composition of Rice". June 2015.
24. SAQSIQ Bulletin No. 224 (2015). "PCR Testing Methods for Determining GM Composition of Optimum Intrasect". September 2015.


Annex Ⅱ

List of Compilers of China's Third National Report on the Implementation of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety

Final Reviewer of the Report:
Mr. Li Ganjie, Vice Minister, Ministry of Environmental Protection
Coordinators of the Project:
Mr. Zhuang Guotai, Director General, Department of Nature and Ecology Conservation, MEP
Mr. Bai Chengshou, Deputy Director General, Department of Nature and Ecology Conservation, MEP
Writers of the Report:
Ms. Liu Yan, Associate Professor, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, MEP
Ms. Jing Xin, Director, National Biosafety Administration Office, MEP
Members of Compiling Group:
Ministry of Environmental Protection
Ms. Jing Xin, Director, National Biosafety Administration Office
Ms. Gu Li, Deputy Director, Department of International Cooperation
Ms. Liu Yan, Associate Professor, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Ms. Zhang Jia, Attache, Department of Treaties and Laws
Ministry of Education
Mr. Zou Hui, Deputy Director, Department of Science and Technology
Mr. Shao Haitao, Principal Staff Member, Department of Science and Technology
Mr. Ye Gongyin, Professor, Zhejiang University
Ministry of Science and Technology
Ms. Sun Yanrong, Director, Department of Science and Technology Development for Social Development
Mr. Wan Zhaofeng, Principal Staff Member, Department of Science and Technology Development for Social Development
Mr. Lin Lei, Principal Staff Member, Department of Science and Technology Development for Social Development
Ministry of Agriculture
Mr. He Yibing, Director, Department of Science, Technology and Education
Mr. Liu Peilei, Deputy Director, Development Center of Science and Technology
Mr. Wang Zhixing, Professor, Biotechnology Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Ms. Wang Xujing, Associate Professor, Biotechnology Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
National Health and Family Planning Commission
Ms. Xu Jiao, Deputy Director, Department of Food Standards, Risk Surveillance and Assessment
Mr. Yuan Bohua, Principal Staff Member, Department of Food Standards, Risk Surveillance and Assessment
Mr. Xu Haibin, Professor, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment
State Administration of Customs
Mr. Li Ning, Principal Staff Member, Department of Supervision, GAC
State Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine
Mr. Wan Benyi, Deputy Director, Department for Supervision on Animal & Plant Quarantine
Mr. Yuan Bozeng, Principal Staff Member, Department for Supervision on Animal & Plant Quarantine
Ms. Fu Wei, Associate Professor, Institute of Animal and Plant Quarantine, Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine
State Forestry Administration
Mr. Li Qiling, Director, Centre for Science and Technology Development
Mr. Wang Qiong, Deputy Director, Centre for Science and Technology Development
Mr. Lu Mengzhu, Professor, Institute of Forestry, Chinese Academy of Forestry
Mr. Hu Jianjun, Associate Professor, Institute of Forestry, Chinese Academy of Forestry
China Food and Drug Administration
Mr. NieDake, Director, Department of Food Safety Supervision I
Mr. Jin Bo, Deputy Director, Department of Food Safety Supervision I
Ms. Liu Xiaoyi, Director, National Food Safety Supervision and Inspection Center
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Mr. Tian Yongsheng, Deputy Director, Bureau of Sciences and Technology for Development
Mr. Wei Wei, Associate Professor, Institute of Botany, CAS
Comments on reporting format
185. Please use this field to provide any other information on difficulties that you have encountered in filling in this report
None.