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A note to Theme 1 [#3134]
Nonthreshold concept was adopted in Belarus. The requirements of that concept oblige Legal Entities and Individual Entrepreneurs to put labels on each food package if LMO components have been detected in foodstuffs  (when  presence of even a single DNA molecule with known transgenetic insertion). The quantitative methods of LMO detection using real-time PCR can leads to errors of “below” or “above” levels. Qualitative method using PCR + electrophoresis give a possibility to avoid such a margin of error (principle “yes” or “no”).
posted on 2012-03-22 14:54 UTC by Prof Sergey Dromashko, Belarus
 
RE: A note to Theme 1 [#3138]
Posted on behalf of Gurinder Jit Randhawa:

Dear Kathryn

• Though so far, no labelling threshold has been established in India, but thresholds for labelling and adventitious presence are of utmost importance as a part of detection and identification of LMOs. As in our country, six events of Bt cotton are being commercially cultivated and several other transgenic crops are under stages of field trials/ testing.

So for checking the adventitious presence of LMOs, we perform detection and identification of LMOs as per the guidelines of ISTA or GIPSA or Codex Alimentarius Commission.

• Margin of error has an important role in the interpretation of results because if we need to detect the LMOs in very low quantities and if the margin of error has a significant value, it will definitely affect the calculated value of LMO in the sample. Therefore, the protocols and the expertise, both must work with the minimum chances of error. A technique that is less cumbersome and more straightforward would be useful for LMO testing labs.

Kind Regards
Dr. (Mrs.) Gurinder Jit Randhawa
Principal Scientist
National Research Centre on DNA Fingerprinting
National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources
New Delhi-110012, INDIA
posted on 2012-03-23 13:51 UTC by Kathryn Garforth, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity
 
RE: A note to Theme 1 [#3139]
Posted on behalf of Gurinder Jit Randhawa:

Dear Kathryn,
This is in response to the mail I have received today, There is an excellent publication on LMO detection.
How to Reliably Test for GMOs
Žel, J., Milavec, M., Morisset, D., Plan, D., Van den Eede, G., Gruden, K.
This publication provides the current state-of-the-art on all key topics involved in GMO testing and is a source of detailed practical information for laboratories. Special focus is given to qualitative and quantitative real-time PCR analysis relevant to all areas where detection and identification rely on nucleic acid-based methods. The following topics, important for testing laboratories, are also discussed: organization of the laboratory, focusing on aspects of the quality system and methods for testing, validation and verification of methods, and measurement uncertainty. The Brief also discusses the new challenges of GMOs and novel modified organisms, using new technologies, and the possible solutions for GMO detection, including bioinformatics tools. Finally, legislation on GMOs and sources of information on GMOs are provided, which are relevant not only to testing laboratories, but to anyone interested in GMOs.

I am attaching the information about the book and all relevant details for ordering the book.

Kind Regards
Dr. (Mrs.) Gurinder Jit Randhawa
Principal Scientist
National Research Centre on DNA Fingerprinting
National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources
New Delhi-110012, INDIA
posted on 2012-03-23 13:58 UTC by Kathryn Garforth, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity
 

   
   
Update on 2012-03-23
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