Avena sativa (Oat, AVESA) | BCH-ORGA-SCBD-105607 | Organism | Biosafety Clearing-House

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Organism (ORGA)

last updated: 12 Jun 2014
Organism information
Avena sativa
Kingdom Viridiplantae
Phylum Streptophyta
Class Liliopsida
Order Poales
Family Poaceae
Genus Avena
Species sativa
  • Oat
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  • AVESA
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Crops
Domesticated
Characteristics related to biosafety
The wild ancestor of Avena sativa and the closely related minor crop, A. byzantina, is the hexaploid wild oat A. sterilis. Genetic evidence shows the ancestral forms of A. sterilis grew in the Fertile Crescent of the Near East. Domesticated oats appear relatively late, and far from the Near East, in Bronze Age Europe. Oats, like rye, are usually considered a secondary crop, i.e., derived from a weed of the primary cereal domesticates wheat and barley. As these cereals spread westwards into cooler, wetter areas, this may have favoured the oat weed component, leading to its eventual domestication.
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Oats are grown in temperate regions. They have a lower summer heat requirement and greater tolerance of rain than other cereals, such as wheat, rye or barley, so are particularly important in areas with cool, wet summers, such as Northwest Europe; they are even being grown in Iceland to help prolong the growing season. Oats are an annual plant, and can be planted either in autumn (for late summer harvest) or in the spring (for early autumn harvest).
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  • Feed
  • Food
Additional Information
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Records referencing this document Show in search
Record type Field Record(s)
Genetic element Donor organism(s) 2